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  • Google Map Maker launches in the US

    Google Map Maker was released almost three years ago, allowing users in 183 countries to modify the online maps we've become reliant upon. Now Google has extended the reach of Map Maker to include the United States and added new features such as street-level perspective on places with Street View imagery, editable points of interest, and powerful search options that can see small details like railroad tracks.

  • YouTube Live: The makeover continues

    Another sign that Google is positioning YouTube to compete with broadcast and cable TV, as well as other video-streaming services like Hulu and Netflix: YouTube Live, a new branch of the hugely popular video-sharing service, debuted on Friday.

  • 20 events that shaped the Internet, part 2

    We take the Internet for granted now, but a lot of developments helped to make it the gargantuan shopping, socializing, commerce-helping, video-sharing behemoth it is today.

  • Amazon Cloud Drive and Cloud Player: A hands-on tour

    Amazon's doing its part to usher in cloud computing with Amazon Cloud Drive and Cloud Player. Users get 5 GB of free storage for a general purpose online storage locker and a Web-based music player for desktop computers and Android phones.

  • OMG! LOL: Oxford English Dictionary adds Internet slang

    Timesaving online abbreviations like LOL, OMG and IMHO are now part of the official English language. The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) announced the addition of several initialisms to its only dictionary, adding some interesting trivia behind the origins of these Internet-associated expressions.

  • RIAA thinks LimeWire owes $75 trillion in damages

    The music industry wants LimeWire to pay up to US$75 trillion in damages after losing a copyright infringement claim. That's right . . . $75 trillion. Manhattan federal Judge Kimba Wood has labeled this request "absurd."

  • Compared: IE9 and Firefox 4 release candidate

    This is turning out to be a big week in browser-land, with both the official release of IE9 and the Firefox 4 release candidate (RC) now available for your downloading satisfaction. Both include big changes to the user interface, as well as the underlying technology. Come along as we compare these two new browsers in a few of key areas.

  • Netflix dominates video streaming: there will be blood

    No wonder everybody's gunning for Netflix. The video-streaming service is more popular than many of us imagined. A new study by market research firm The NPD Group shows that Netflix's share of streamed or downloaded digital movies was a competition-crushing 61 percent between January and February 2011.

  • Gmail users are younger and more worldly, study says

    Do use Gmail? If you do, chances are you're an urban-dwelling, world-traveling careerist with a hankering for potato chips, according to a recent survey by personalized Web recommendation engine Hunch. The service took a look at the personal tastes of its users to draw some interesting conclusions about people based on their preferred Webmail service.

  • Get a quick and easy disposable e-mail address

    Here's a common hassle: You sign up for some freebie, promotion, or service that requires your e-mail address--and suddenly your inbox is deluged with ads, notifications, and other spam.

  • Google kills H.264 support in Chrome

    Your move Apple: Google announced that they are changing Chrome's support of HTML5 'video' to be, in Google's view, more friendly towards open development. The H.264 codec is being removed in favor of the Theora and VP8 video codecs as well as any higher quality, open codecs. The resources that were used on H.264 will instead be used in supporting these open technologies.

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